Author: 75th Trombone

Friday, June 26, 2020

Passes at quorum without dissent. –Tantusar

Adminned at 29 Jun 2020 03:27:58 UTC

Add a new subrule after 2.2.2 Designer Templates called “Permitted Widgets”.  Remove the following paragraph from its current place in 2.2.2 and insert it as the first paragraph of the new Permitted Widgets subrule, under the heading “Designer Label”:

A Designer Template shall have, as its topmost Widget, an Elementor “Heading” Widget, whose text must always be the same as the Designer Template’s name. The font size of this heading must be less than or equal to 24 pixels or 1.5 rems.

Then add the following below it:

Icon Box or Image Box

A Designer Template may have one of the following: (1) a single “Icon Box” Widget, OR (2) a single “Image Box” Widget. No image or icon within the chosen Widget may appear taller than 200 CSS pixels at any browser width. No text within it may have a font size greater than 24 pixels or 1.5 rems. Designers may create or upload any image to which they have distribution rights for use in an Image Box widget, so long as it does not violate any other rules.

Friday, June 26, 2020

Self-killed. Josh

Adminned at 28 Jun 2020 20:17:15 UTC

In Rule 2.2 The Second Switch Page, in the fourth paragraph, change “The topmost Section on the SSP shall contain one Column, and that Column shall contain one “Title” Widget, set to display the page’s title.” to this:

The topmost Section on the SSP shall contain one Column, and that Column shall contain one “Page Title” Widget, set to display the page’s title. The settings of this widget may be changed at the discretion of the Lead Developer, provided that the settings do not break any rules.

In Rule 2.2.2 Designer Templates, change “All Designers may create one regular Elementor Template (not a Theme Builder or Popup Template), named ‘[Playername]’s Template’ ” to this:

All Designers may create one regular Elementor Template (not a Theme Builder or Popup Template) with a template type of “Section”, named “[Playername]’s Template”

Also in Rule 2.2.2, add this to the end of the second paragraph:

The Admin should confirm that the Template abides by the Ruleset before populating it, and if it is found not to abide by the Ruleset, the Admin must decline to populate it and comment on the request explaining which rule they think it breaks and why. The creator of the Designer Template must then make a new post requesting that it be populated into the Canvas.

Also in Rule 2.2.2, change “A Designer may edit their Designer Template in any permitted way as a Daily Action.” to this:

A Designer may edit their Designer Template as often as they wish if it is not yet populated into the Canvas. If it is populated into the Canvas, the Designer may edit it in any permissible way as a Daily Action. If a Designer Template on the Canvas is found to break a rule, the Designer may edit it at any time to make it conform to the rules, even if the rules regarding Daily Actions would prohibit it; however, such an edit still counts as a Daily Action for the purposes of determining whether a future edit to this template is legal. Such an edit must be announced in a blog post before being made, and may not make any changes not related to making the Designer Template conform to the rules.

Finally, below the last paragraph of Rule 2.2.2, add this:

Any Designer may challenge the legality of any other Designer’s Designer Template by making a post to the Votable Matter category whose title begins with the string [SSP], and whose text explains the illegality and proposes a change to the Template to make it conform to the rules. If the post is Enacted, the proposed change shall be made by the enacting Admin. Such a Votable Matter is not required, however; if a Designer can be convinced in any informal way that their Template breaks the rules, they may simply announce their change and make it, as described above.

Friday, June 26, 2020

Passed 5–0. —75th Trombone

Adminned at 26 Jun 2020 13:56:45 UTC

Under rule 1.2, change “Any active Designer of the main BlogNomic game at https://blognomic.com may apply to join the BlogNomic WordPress test by contacting an active Admin with their request. When an Admin has created an account for them and set their “Designer status” profile field to Active, thus adding them to the roster in the sidebar, they become a Designer.” to the following:

Any active Designer of the main BlogNomic game at https://blognomic.com may sign up for a BlogNomic WordPress test account, using the same name and email address they use at the main BlogNomic game, at https://wp.blognomic.com/register. When they have saved their profile fields with “Player status” set to “Active” and appear as an active player in the sidebar, they become a Designer.

yay for making hasty changes at the last minute!

Thursday, June 25, 2020

Passed 6-0. Adminned by 75th Trombone.

Adminned at 26 Jun 2020 13:40:30 UTC

Add a new rule, called “Elementor Basics”, with the following text:

When any of the following terms is used in reference to the contents of a page on https://wp.blognomic.com, they refer to their meaning in the Elementor page builder and its documentation:

  • Section
  • Column
  • Widget
  • Template

Any of the above terms may be preceded by the word “Elementor” for clarity.

When referring to the contents of a page on https://wiki.blognomic.com, including the Ruleset itself, these terms do not refer to their meaning in Elementor unless specified otherwise.

Add another new rule, called “The Second Switch Page”, with the following text:

The page at https://wp.blognomic.com/second-switch-page, if it exists, is known as the Second Switch Page or SSP, and is Gamestate. Its WordPress title shall be “Second Switch Page”.

The SSP shall consist of one or more Elementor Sections and their contents.

No SSP Sections may contain any Columns not authorized by the Ruleset. No SSP Columns may contain any Widgets not authorized by the Ruleset. No Designer, even Admins, may change the settings of SSP Sections or Columns from their default settings, except as explicitly permitted by the Ruleset.

The topmost Section on the SSP shall contain one Column, and that Column shall contain one Title widget, set to display the page’s title.

All other SSP Sections shall collectively be known as the Canvas, and individually known as Canvas Sections.

The Canvas

Only Admins may edit the Canvas, and Admins may only edit it as the Ruleset allows.

All Canvas Sections shall contain between 2 and 4 Columns. All the columns within a Canvas Section must be equally wide, and all together must be the full width of the Section.

All of a Canvas Section’s Columns must contain at least one Widget.

New Widgets being added into empty Columns must follow the following algorithm (depicted here), unless otherwise permitted in the Ruleset:

1. No Widget may be added to an empty Canvas until 2 Widgets are ready to be populated at the same time. (This is implied by the requirements that Canvas Sections must have at least 2 Columns, and that all Columns must have at least one Widget.)
2. The order of Widgets will always be preserved left-to-right then top-to-bottom, in the order that their addition was required or requested.
3. When 2 Widgets are ready to be added, the Admin editing the template will create the first Canvas Section with a two-column layout, then add them.
4. When the 3rd Widget is ready to be added, the Section will have 3 columns.
5. When the 4th Widget is ready, the Section will have 4 columns.
6. When the 5th Widget is ready, the Section will have 3 columns, and a new Section below it will have 2.
7. When the 6th Widget is ready, the older Section and newer Section will both have 3 Columns.
8. When the 7th Widget is ready, the older Section will have 4 Columns and the newer one 3.
9. When the 8th Widget is ready, both older and newer Sections will have 4.
10. When the 9th Widget is ready, the algorithm repeats the pattern started in step 6 above, with the “newer” Section now considered the “older” one, and another new Section created below it.

Designer Templates

All Designers may create one regular Elementor Template (not a Theme Builder or Popup template), named “[Playername]’s Template”, where [Playername] is replaced by the Designer’s BlogNomic name. Such templates are known as “Designer Templates”.

After creating their Designer Template, a Designer may make a blog post requesting an Admin to populate it into the Canvas, or, if they are an Admin, announcing that they will do so themselves. No Designer Template may be populated into the Canvas without such a post being made.

Designer Templates are populated into the Canvas by adding an Elementor “Template” Widget to an empty Column, then choosing the Template.

A Designer Template shall have only one Section, containing only one Column, and shall have no Widgets not permitted by the Ruleset. However, the Designer may change any of their Template’s Widgets’ settings — except for Custom CSS, which must remain empty unless otherwise permitted — in any way not forbidden by the Ruleset.

A Designer Template shall have, as its topmost widget, an Elementor “Heading” Widget, whose text must always be the same as the Designer Template’s name. The font size of this heading must be less than or equal to 24 pixels or 1.5 rems.

No part of a Designer Template may ever exceed the bounds of its Column on the Canvas by any method, including but not limited to overly large fonts or relative/absolute positioning. This includes all browser widths; therefore, Designers should test their Templates at all browser widths and make width-specific adjustments as supported by Elementor if need be.

A Designer may edit their Designer Template in any permitted way as a Daily Action.

Create a new WordPress page located at wp.blognomic.com/second-switch-page, conforming with the above rules.

Phew. It’s been a long time since I wrote a BlogNomic Proposal, and I may have broken any number of unwritten conventions that have come about in the past decade or so. If I’ve done anything too egregious, feel free to vote against this and I’ll reword and repost.

Thursday, June 25, 2020

There was a time when a little HTML and CSS knowledge could make a lucrative career. But these days we front-end developers are feeling the squeeze from two sides.

On one side, the JavaScript community (may it suffer eternally) is doing its level best to turn the simple languages of the Web into a monstrous Rube Goldberg machine of JS libraries on top of JS libraries, in an effort to make websites as complex and abstruse as native applications. They claim to do this to enable building powerful web apps with only front-end skills, but they actually do it for their perverse idea of fun.

On the other side are the page builders. They go by many names — Squarespace, Wix, Divi, Avada — but their common goal is to enable the masses to build websites with zero web development knowledge. They are of various success in meeting this goal, and they each commit a various number of abominations in their pursuit of it.

The time may be coming when you Designers are the sole people building marketing sites, and the Reactheads and Webpack weenies have cornered the market on functional web apps, leaving front-end specialists like me unemployed and destitute.

Fortunately, I, the Lead Developer on this project, find your cause infinitely more admirable than theirs.

So I have chosen what I consider to be the most worthy of the page builders, Elementor, as the tool with which you Designers will supplant me. I will teach you about it as best I can, and the best among you will be promoted to Creative Director, at which point I will leave you to maintain your glorious new creation.


Replace all instances in the ruleset of “Player” (except the first instance in Rule 4.4.4) with “Designer”, and all instances of “Emperor” with “Lead Developer”.